Immanuel Kant by Sissela Bok also presents the same argument.

Paper-Research: Bio of Sissela Ann Bok

In April 1955, a month before I was to be married, at age 20, to Derek Bok and fly from Paris across the Atlantic to take a chance on finding lasting happiness in a new life, in a new country, I sat down to ask, in my journal, about my hesitations and questions: Would I, after leaving friends and family, be able to find new roots in America? Would I seize the opportunity to grow, flourish, give myself for what I love? Above all, would I at my death look back and discover that I had found happiness by making others happy?

Sissela Bok is a writer and moral philosopher. She is a visiting senior fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Her most recent book is Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science.

Sissela Bok is a writer and moral philosopher. She is a visiting senior fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Her most recent book is Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science.

The American Scholar: Meeting the Mystics - Sissela Bok

Sissela Bok is a writer and moral philosopher. She is a visiting senior fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Her most recent book is Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science.

Sissela Ann Bok Facts - YourDictionary

Taking up where Bok's highly praised treatise, Lying (1978), left off, Secrets explores a broader and more confusing terrain almost as ably. Bok has a sharp analytical eye, discriminating judgment, a solid sense of history, and a thorough knowledge of how the world actually works. But whereas her earlier book started from the assumption that lying was ""prima facie wrong,"" this one begins by acknowledging the basic ambiguousness of secrecy. ""Secrecy both protects and thwarts moral perception, reasoning, and choice. Secret practices protect the liberty of some while impairing that of others. They guard intimacy and creativity, yet tend to spread and invite abuse."" So, to Bok, there can be no single, unequivocal criterion for evaluating secrecy (though in the public sphere she tends to mistrust it), and her presentation consequently suffers from a certain diffusiveness. The only really unified part is the treatment, in the later chapters, of trade and corporate secrecy, secrecy in science, military and state secrets, whistleblowing and leaks, undercover operations, and so on. Here Bok finds a pervasive information-stifling (e.g., The Pentagon Papers) that can't be justified by the usual rationales of national security, law and order, etc. Discussing the spread of police entrapment, as in ABSCAM, she dryly notes that such operations seldom do anything but document the crimes they generate. On the other hand, Bok admits functional limits to the public's ""right to know."" The earlier chapters, on the role of secrecy in private life and the formation of the self, are somewhat loose if not haphazard. For example, her treatment of gossip (sometimes destructive, sometimes merely trivial, but not the despicable vice that lofty thinkers such as Kierkegaard and Heidegger contend) reads more like a separate essay than part of a tightly structured argument. Still, even as a series of discursive essays, covering everything from 18th-century French freemasonry to the Bay of Pigs invasion, this is practical philosophizing of a very high order.

Lying: Sissela Bok | Working Truths

Sissela Bok, I suppose, requires a university course––the semester ..

Bok's contribution to the collection of essays was the article "Euthanasia and the Care of the Dying," the introductory article in the collection and the one most influential in further discussions of the morality of euthanasia.

Sissela Bok - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core

Respected by fellow scholars, she was also highly regarded by the media, which often sought her views on ethics and philosophy.Sissela Bok was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on December 2, 1934, the daughter of Gunnar and Alva (Reimer) Myrdal.


Ideas of the two authors Philosopher Sissela Bok does not supports the act of whistle blowing within the organization.

Moreover, lying has some of the same components as secret keeping. A secret is something that is kept intentionally hidden, set apart in the mind of its keeper as requiring concealment (Bok, 1989). Psychology Today examined secret keeping and said that it is more difficult to keep secrets than imagined. People must constantly monitor what they do and say, especially in the presence of those from whom they are keeping the secret. Secrecy also requires the suppression of thoughts about that secret. All of the work and effort involved in keeping secrets can take a biological toll. A study showed that the greater the concealment, the higher the rates of disease and death (Anderson, 2003).

Get this from a library! The Dilemmas of euthanasia. [John A Behnke; Sissela Bok;]

However, even though lying has become a common part of life, which most have come to accept, Sissela Bok notes that lying (deceit) is a form of deliberate assault on human beings, which can coerce people into acting against their will (1999). She argues that lying distorts information and our situation as we perceive it, as well as our choices. Bok quotes Hartmann in that a lie “injures the deceived person in his life” (1999, p.19). According to Bok, lying (deceit) takes on two different perspectives: (1) the perspective of the deceived, and (2) the perspective of the liar (1999).

Roger Rosenblatt in conversation. with Derek and Sissela Bok. Although moral philosophy has an important place in life, it is often overlooked. People ask legal

Is there anything a person can do before becoming a patient to decrease the chances of being reduced to intolerable levels of suffering, loneliness, and dehumanization?" is one of the most significant books in philosophy written in the 20th century, and it alone established Bok's reputation as a moral philosopher of international renown.