Pleasure Of Reading Essay In English

Free Essays on Pleasure Of Reading For Class 6 through

But if in Noble Minds some Dregs remain,

Not yet purg'd off, of Spleen and sow'r Disdain,

Discharge that Rage on more Provoking Crimes,

Nor fear a Dearth in these Flagitious Times.

No Pardon vile Obscenity should find,

Tho' Wit and Art conspire to move your Mind;

But Dulness with Obscenity must prove

As Shameful sure as Importance in Love.

In the fat Age of Pleasure, Wealth, and Ease,

Sprung the rank Weed, and thriv'd with large Increase;

When Love was all an easie Monarch's Care;

Seldom at Council, never in a War:

Jilts rul'd the State, and Statesmen Farces writ;

Nay Wits had Pensions, and young Lords had Wit:

The Fair sate panting at a Courtier's Play,

And not a Mask went un-improv'd away:

The modest Fan was liked up no more,

And Virgins smil'd at what they blush'd before--

The following Licence of a Foreign Reign

Did all the Dregs of bold Socinus drain;

Then Unbelieving Priests reform'd the Nation,

And taught more Pleasant Methods of Salvation;

Where Heav'ns Free Subjects might their Rights dispute,

Lest God himself shou'd seem too Absolute.

Pulpits their Sacred Satire learn'd to spare,

And Vice admir'd to find a Flatt'rer there!

Encourag'd thus, Witt's Titans brav'd the Skies,

And the Press groan'd with Licenc'd Blasphemies--

These Monsters, Criticks! with your Darts engage,

Here point your Thunder, and exhaust your Rage!

Yet shun their Fault, who, Scandalously nice,

Will needs mistake an Author into Vice;

All seems Infected that th' Infected spy,

As all looks yellow to the Jaundic'd Eye.

But most by Numbers judge a Poet's Song,

And smooth or rough, with them, is right or wrong;

In the bright Muse tho' thousand Charms conspire,

Her Voice is all these tuneful Fools admire,

Who haunt Parnassus but to please their Ear,

Not mend their Minds; as some to Church repair,

Not for the Doctrine, but the Musick there.

These Equal Syllables alone require,

Tho' oft the Ear the open Vowels tire,

While Expletives their feeble Aid do join,

And ten low Words oft creep in one dull Line,

While they ring round the same unvary'd Chimes,

With sure Returns of still expected Rhymes.

Where-e'er you find the cooling Western Breeze,

In the next Line, it whispers thro' the Trees;

If Chrystal Streams with pleasing Murmurs creep,

The Reader's threaten'd (not in vain) with Sleep.

Then, at the last, and only Couplet fraught

With some unmeaning Thing they call a Thought,

A needless Alexandrine ends the Song,

That like a wounded Snake, drags its slow length along.

Leave such to tune their own dull Rhimes, and know

What's roundly smooth, or languishingly slow;

And praise the Easie Vigor of a Line,

Where Denham's Strength, and Waller's Sweetness join.

True Ease in Writing comes from Art, not Chance,

As those move easiest who have learn'd to dance,

'Tis not enough no Harshness gives Offence,

The Sound must seem an Eccho to the Sense.

Soft is the Strain when Zephyr gently blows,

And the smooth Stream in smoother Numbers flows;

But when loud Surges lash the sounding Shore,

The hoarse, rough Verse shou'd like the Torrent roar.

When Ajax strives, some Rocks' vast Weight to throw,

The Line too labours, and the Words move slow;

Not so, when swift Camilla scours the Plain,

Flies o'er th'unbending Corn, and skims along the Main.

Hear how Timotheus' vary'd Lays surprize,

And bid Alternate Passions fall and rise!

While, at each Change, the Son of Lybian Jove

Now burns with Glory, and then melts with Love;

Now his fierce Eyes with sparkling Fury glow;

Now Sighs steal out, and Tears begin to flow:

Persians and Greeks like Turns of Nature found,

And the World's Victor stood subdu'd by Sound!

The Pow'rs of Musick all our Hearts allow;

And what Timotheus was, is Dryden now.

A little Learning is a dang'rous Thing;

Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring:

There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,

And drinking largely sobers us again.

Fir'd at first Sight with what the Muse imparts,

In fearless Youth we tempt the Heights of Arts,

While from the bounded Level of our Mind,

Short Views we take, nor see the lengths behind,

But more advanc'd, behold with strange Surprize

New, distant Scenes of endless Science rise!

So pleas'd at first, the towring Alps we try,

Mount o'er the Vales, and seem to tread the Sky;

Th' Eternal Snows appear already past,

And the first Clouds and Mountains seem the last:

But those attain'd, we tremble to survey

The growing Labours of the lengthen'd Way,

Th' increasing Prospect tires our wandering Eyes,

Hills peep o'er Hills, and Alps on Alps arise!

Free Essays on Pleasure Of Reading For Class 6

Our Reading will proceed from narrative and lyric to essays, argumentand criticism, and the pupil will learn to try his own hand at writingthis kind of thing. Many lessons--on whatever subject--will take the formof debates; and the place of individual or choral recitation will be takenby dramatic performances, with special attention to plays in which an argumentis stated in dramatic form.

so you will never stop learning from the pleasure of reading

Hear how learn'd Greece her useful Rules indites,

When to repress, and when indulge our Flights:

High on Parnassus' Top her Sons she show'd,

And pointed out those arduous Paths they trod,

Held from afar, aloft, th' Immortal Prize,

And urg'd the rest by equal Steps to rise;

Just Precepts thus from great Examples giv'n,

She drew from them what they deriv'd from Heav'n

The gen'rous Critick fann'd the Poet's Fire,

And taught the World, with Reason to Admire.

Then Criticism the Muse's Handmaid prov'd,

To dress her Charms, and make her more belov'd;

But following Wits from that Intention stray'd;

Who cou'd not win the Mistress, woo'd the Maid;

Against the Poets their own Arms they turn'd,

Sure to hate most the Men from whom they learn'd

So modern Pothecaries, taught the Art

By Doctor's Bills to play the Doctor's Part,

Bold in the Practice of mistaken Rules,

Prescribe, apply, and call their Masters Fools.

Some on the Leaves of ancient Authors prey,

Nor Time nor Moths e'er spoil'd so much as they:

Some dryly plain, without Invention's Aid,

Write dull Receits how Poems may be made:

These leave the Sense, their Learning to display,

And theme explain the Meaning quite away

Pleasure of Reading Essay Examples

essay sample on Pleasure of Reading or ..

But where's the Man, who Counsel can bestow,

Still pleas'd to teach, and not proud to know?

Unbiass'd, or by Favour or by Spite;

Not dully prepossest, nor blindly right;

Tho' Learn'd well-bred; and tho' well-bred, sincere;

Modestly bold, and Humanly severe?

Who to a Friend his Faults can freely show,

And gladly praise the Merit of a Foe?

Blest with a Taste exact, yet unconfin'd;

A Knowledge both of Books and Humankind;

Gen'rous Converse; a Sound exempt from Pride;

And Love to Praise, with Reason on his Side?

Pleasure of learning essay - PR365

But soon by Impious Arms from Latium chas'd,

Their ancient Bounds the banish'd Muses past:

Thence Arts o'er all the Northern World advance,

But Critic Learning flourish'd most in France.

The Rules, a Nation born to serve, obeys,

And Boileau still in Right of Horace sways.

But we, brave Britons, Foreign Laws despis'd,

And kept unconquer'd and unciviliz'd,

Fierce for the Liberties of Wit, and bold,

We still defy'd the Romans as of old.

Yet some there were, among the sounder Few

Of those who less presum'd, and better knew,

Who durst assert the juster Ancient Cause,

And here restor'd Wit's Fundamental Laws.

Such was the Muse, whose Rules and Practice tell,

Nature's chief Master-piece is writing well.

Such was Roscomon--not more learn'd than good,

With Manners gen'rous as his Noble Blood;

To him the Wit of Greece and Rome was known,

And ev'ry Author's Merit, but his own.

Such late was Walsh,--the Muse's Judge and Friend,

Who justly knew to blame or to commend;

To Failings mild, but zealous for Desert;

The clearest Head, and the sincerest Heart.

This humble Praise, lamented Shade! receive,

This Praise at least a grateful Muse may give!

The Muse, whose early Voice you taught to Sing,

Prescrib'd her Heights, and prun'd her tender Wing,

(Her Guide now lost) no more attempts to rise,

But in low Numbers short Excursions tries:

Content, if hence th' Unlearned their Wants may view,

The Learn'd reflect on what before they knew:

Careless of Censure, not too fond of Fame,

Still pleas'd to praise, yet not afraid to blame,

Averse alike to Flatter, or Offend,

Not free from Faults, nor yet too vain to mend.


Need essay sample on "What’s Your Learning Style?"

In this essay, Miss Sayers suggests that we presently teach our childreneverything but how to learn. She proposes that we adopt a suitably modifiedversion of the medieval scholastic curriculum for methodological reasons.

What’s Your Learning Style? Essay - Paper Topics

'Twere well, might Criticks still this Freedom take;

But Appius reddens at each Word you speak,

And stares, Tremendous! with a threatning Eye

Like some fierce Tyrant in Old Tapestry!

Fear most to tax an Honourable Fool,

Whose Right it is, uncensur'd to be dull;

Such without Wit are Poets when they please.

As without Learning they can take Degrees.

Leave dang'rous Truths to unsuccessful Satyrs,

And Flattery to fulsome Dedicators,

Whom, when they Praise, the World believes no more,

Than when they promise to give Scribling o'er.

'Tis best sometimes your Censure to restrain,

And charitably let the Dull be vain:

Your Silence there is better than your Spite,

For who can rail so long as they can write?

Still humming on, their drowzy Course they keep,

And lash'd so long, like Tops, are lash'd asleep.

False Steps but help them to renew the Race,

As after Stumbling, Jades will mend their Pace.

What Crouds of these, impenitently bold,

In Sounds and jingling Syllables grown old,

Still run on Poets in a raging Vein,

Ev'n to the Dregs and Squeezings of the Brain;

Strain out the last, dull droppings of their Sense,

And Rhyme with all the Rage of Impotence!